Meet the Author

  • Beatrice Andrew
  • Head of Neuromarketing
Beatrice has a Neuroscience degree from King’s College London where she specialised in the biomechanics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Astrocyte function of Major Depressive Disorder. Beatrice begun her creative career in branding & design. She was previously a Digital Planner for Google and now runs the Neuromarketing department at Lab. She enjoys applying her love of science and psychology with a passion for digital innovation.

Takeaways

  • Neuromarketing is an area of marketing that uses neuropsychological principles to study and influence consumer behaviour - find out more!

What is neuromarketing?


09 October 2019
4 mins

What is Neuromarketing?

Neuromarketing is an area of marketing that uses neuropsychological and neuroscience principles to understand and guide consumer behaviour. 

The purpose of neuromarketing is to better understand consumers and how they interpret visual stimuli, language and experiences.

This can include:

  • Branding

  • Advertising - offline and online

  • Website and app design

  • UX design and user journeys

  • Copy and messaging

The results of quantitative and qualitative analysis of how consumers respond and interpret these stimuli are used to improve and refine audience engagement and the actions they take.

Neuromarketing principles more broadly may also be used in the first instance to inform visual design, language and messaging and overall audience experience. 

A Brief History of Neuromarketing

Early interdisciplinary research into neuromarketing as an area of academic study began in the early 1990s, drawing on areas such as neuroscience, neuropsychology, behavioural economics and consumer behaviour. 

The term neuromarketing was first used by professor Ale Smidts in 2002, with the first experiments occurring in the late 1990s around using imagery to specifically elicit a positive emotional response in the audience.

These studies gained popularity with household names such as Coca-Cola, who used neuromarketing concepts to better understand the relationship between marketing stimuli and consumer neuroactivity.

Neuromarketing today has grown and evolved into a distinct marketing discipline, with agencies like LAB, and in-house departments using studies, techniques and strategies to better understand human behaviour to improve marketing, digital and brand experiences.

Neuromarketing as a Concept

Neuromarketing is used principally to improve the effectiveness of marketing strategies and activity. 

By better understanding the deeper assumptions, motivations and reactions of an audience, marketing, design and digital experiences can be improved to achieve the desired goals of the marketing campaign, web design or user journey. This can include:

  • Increased brand awareness and website traffic

  • Improved web experiences

  • Improved messaging relevancy

  • Increased business enquiries, leads or sales

  • Refined brand positioning

  • Improved audience engagement and retention

Neuromarketing Tactics

There are specific neuromarketing techniques that are used to understand unconscious responses to marketing stimuli. Just a few are listed below:

Biometric Testing e.g. Eye Tracking and Facial Coding

When testing a web experience or advertising, eye tracking data can be recorded and analysed to identify whether the user is looking at specific objects, stimuli or elements and whether their facial movements indicate a positive or negative reaction to the stimuli. 

For example, a user may be missing important calls-to-action or information when browsing a website, and so this journey and placement of design elements and messaging may need to be changed to better engage the user and encourage them to take the desired action. 

Another example could be brow furrow indicating cognitive strain. The way facial coding is interpreted highly depends on the context, but usually suggests frustration or increased attention. 

Use of Behavioural Economics & Nudge Theory e.g. Anchoring

Nudge theory has been shown to outperform changes in governmental legislation from a behavioural perspective. An example of a nudge includes Anchoring, which harnesses the understanding that consumers evaluate options when given choices, and thus context is key to the perceived value of a product or service.

For example, if you wanted people to tip more in a restaurant, as the average tip was 10%, you could present the following suggested tip options when users paid by card, with the option to add a manual amount if they wanted. 

  • 20%

  • 15%

  • 12%

By presenting 12% as the lowest tip option and surrounding it with more greater percentages, consumers are more likely to choose a 12% tip due to the context in which it is presented and the more expensive options it is presented alongside.

Interested in How Neuromarketing Can Help Your Business?

LAB is a neuromarketing company specialising in studying human behaviour to create powerful marketing and digital experiences.

If you’re interested in how we can help you improve your business, better understand our audience and achieve your marketing goals, submit an enquiry, email us at hello@lab.co.uk or call us on 0207 183 6668. 

Alternatively, take a look at our Monkey, Lion, Dog Quiz to learn about your personality and motives.



Takeaways

  • Neuromarketing is an area of marketing that uses neuropsychological principles to study and influence consumer behaviour - find out more!

Meet the Author

  • Beatrice Andrew
  • Head of Neuromarketing
Beatrice has a Neuroscience degree from King’s College London where she specialised in the biomechanics of Alzheimer’s Disease and Astrocyte function of Major Depressive Disorder. Beatrice begun her creative career in branding & design. She was previously a Digital Planner for Google and now runs the Neuromarketing department at Lab. She enjoys applying her love of science and psychology with a passion for digital innovation.